There are vast differences between the natural “progesterone” that the body makes and “progestin” that is a man made chemical substitute.

Progesterone is produced by the ovary once the egg matures and is released.  A cyst forms in the area called a corpus luteum and this is what produces progesterone during the 2nd half of a woman’s reproductive cycle.  Progesterone is also produced by the adrenal cortex and by the placenta when pregnancy occurs.

Progesterone’s primary role is to conduct the entire endocrine system (balancing all the hormones in the body.)  Reproductively progesterone helps to maintain and thicken the uterine lining in the luteal phase of the cycle, it helps to maintain a pregnancy when a fertilized egg implants.

CBprogesteroneproveramoleculesIf progesterone is unbalanced it can cause many areas of the body to become unbalanced and “sick”.  The main area you can tell if you have a  progesterone deficiency is if you suffer from PMS.  This is just the surface of the damage that a deficiency in this hormone can cause.  The good news is that it’s easily remedied.

Progestin is a manmade chemical that is suppose to resemble or replace progesterone.  If progesterone is a cymbal in the symphony of the body – then progestin is the trashcan lid – while it may resemble progesterone it’s not quite the same – therefore it can adversely affect the body.

Progestin is used in chemical birth control and in hormone replacement therapy.  Progestin suppresses ovulation, thus avoiding all the indications of ovulation – possible pregnancy, PMS, fibroid growth, endometriosis growth, etc.  But because progestin is artificial it’s not beneficial to the body and will cause side effects such as imbalanced hormones.

It’s because nothing replaces progesterone as well as a natural progesterone derived from wild yams or soybeans.

Visit Our Catalog to purchase this product and other great hormonal and daily health products.

 

 

 

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